THE 2013-2014 COURSE SCHEDULE

Hopkins Marine Station offers a Marine Biology curriculum in the Winter, Spring, and Summer Quarters. These courses (open to students in all majors) expand the coverage of subjects basic to all biological and environmental sciences and provide upper-level undergraduate and graduate students with courses in a variety of topics related to life in the oceans.

In some respects, the curriculum at Hopkins is analogous to attending one of Stanford's overseas campuses: students take up residence in Pacific Grove and spend an entire quarter studying aspects of biology that are not available on the main campus.

 
AUTUMN  

BIO3 Frontiers in Marine Biology, 1 unit

An introduction to contemporary research in marine biology, including ecology, conservation biology, environmental toxicology, behavior, biomechanics, evolution, neurobiology, and molecular biology. Emphasis is on new discoveries and the technologies used to make them. Weekly lectures by faculty from the Hopkins Marine Station. Somero(taught on main campus)

BIO 10SC Natural History, Marine Biology, and Research, 2 units

Monterey Bay is home to the nation's largest marine sanctuary and also home to Stanford's Hopkins Marine Station. This course, which is based at Hopkins, explores the spectacular biology of Monterey Bay and the artistic and political history of the region. Thompson   more ...

BIO 12N Sensory Ecology of Marine Animals, 3 units

Animals living in the oceans experience a highly varied range of environmental stimuli. An aquatic lifestyle requires an equally rich range of sensory adaptations, including some that are totally foreign to us. In this course we will examine sensory system in marine animals from both an environmental and behavioral perspective and from the point of view of neuroscience and information systems engineering. Thompson (taught on main campus)

165H

BIOHOPK 180H/280H Air and Water, 3 units

Introduction to environmental physics. The physical properties of life's fluids compared and contrasted. How and why life has evolved differently on land than water. Topics: density, viscosity, diffusion, thermal properties, sound, light, evaporation, and surface tension. Three lectures per week, tutorials. Suggested Background Courses: Physics 21, 23 or 51, 53; calculus. The Biology Core, or consent of the instructor. Denny

279H

BIOHOPK 276H Estimates and Errors: The Theory of Scientific Measurement, 3 units

Measurement plays a fundamental role in science, but many biologists have no formal training in what it means to measure something. Errors are inevitable in any measurement. Which are inherent, and which can be controlled? How do errors propagate? How can you decide which data to reject? When are uncertainties normal? In this course we will work our way into the theory of measurement, covering some topics that overlap with inferential statistics (but from a new and perhaps more intuitive perspective), and extending beyond those basics to include spectral analysis and the dangers of measurement in the digital realm. Denny

   
WINTER  
150H

BIOHOPK 150H/250H Ecological Mechanics, 2 units

The principles of life's physical interactions. We will explore basic physics and fluid dynamics to see how these physical principles can be used to investigate ecology at levels from the individual to the community. Beginning with a review of basic physics we will investigate: response functions, diffusion, basic fluid dynamics, boundary layers, fluid-dynamic forces, and locomotion. In each case, we will learn the physics and engineering in the context of ecology. Some familiarity with basic physics and calculus advantageous, but not necessary. Denny

BIOHOPK 161H/261H Invertebrate Zoology, 5 units, LAB

Look almost anywhere on earth and you'll find invertebrates living there.  They range in size from microscopic mites to giant squid that weigh a couple of tons.  Some invertebrates rival fishes as itinerant pelagic wanderers, while others live attached to one spot, never going anywhere at all.  There are invertebrates whose lives last less than a day, while others live for centuries. Watanabe   more ...

BIOHOPK 163H/263H Oceanic Biology, 4 units

How the physics and chemistry of the oceanic environment affect marine plants and animals. Topics: seawater and ocean circulation, separation of light and nutrients in the two-layered ocean, oceanic food webs and trophic interactions, oceanic environments, biogeography, and global change. Lectures, discussion, and field trips. Recommended: PHYSICS 21 or 51, CHEM 31, the Biology core, or consent of instructor. Denny, Somero

BIOHOPK 166H/266H Molecular Ecology, 5 units, LAB

How modern technologies in gene sequencing, detection of nuclear nucleotide polymorphisms, and other approaches are used to gather data on genetic variation that allow measurement of population structure, infer demographic histories, inform conservation efforts, and advance understanding of the ecology of diverse types of organisms. Palumbi

BIOHOPK 172H/272H Marine Ecology, 5 units, LAB

Held all day, one day a week. Lecture topics include biodiversity, intertidal communities, species interactions, and specific lectures introducing lab topics. The labs then take students out into the field to areas around the Monterey Peninsula, including Elkhorn Slough and Point Pinos, to observe and collect data sets, which students then learn how to analyze, using computer programs such as Excel and Primer. Micheli   more ...

177H

BIOHOPK 177H/277H Dynamics and Management of Marine Populations, 4 units

Course examines the ecological factors and processes that control natural and harvested marine populations. Course emphasizes mathematical models as tools to assess the dynamics of populations and to derive projections of their demographic fate under different management scenarios. Course objectives will be met by a combination of theoretical lectures, assigned readings and class discussions, case study analysis and interactive computer sessions. De Leo

BIOHOPK 187H/287H Sensory Ecology, 4 units

Topics: the ways animals receive, filter, and process information gleaned from the environment, sensory receptor mechanisms, neural processing, specialization to life underwater, communication within and between species, the importance of behavior to ecosystem structure and dynamics, the impact of acoustic and light pollution on marine animals. The lab section of the course will explore sensory mechanisms using neurobiological methods and methods of experimental animal behavior. Syllabus. Final Project for 2014. Thompson

BIOHOPK 199H Undergraduate Research, 1-15 units

Qualified undergraduates undertake individual work in the fields listed under 300H. Arrangements must be made by consultation or correspondence. Block, Crowder, De Leo, Denny, Gilly, Lowe, Micheli, Palumbi, Somero, Thompson, Watanabe  more ...

   
SPRING  

BIOHOPK 43 (Equivalent to BIO 43) Plant Biology, Evolution, & Ecology, 5 units

The class delves into plant physiology, structure and diversity, micro and macroevolution, as well as an introduction to population genetic, and population, community and ecosystem ecology. Hopkins faculty are at the forefront of research, covering topics from algae structure (Mark Denny) to sea urchin population genetics (Steve Palumbi) to intertidal ecology (Jim Watanabe). In this bio core class, everybody gets a front row seat to new and exciting biological studies. Denny, Palumbi, Watanabe   more ...

BIOHOPK 44Y Core Laboratory in Plant Biology, Ecology, and Evolution, 5 units

Laboratory and field projects provide working familiarity with the concepts, organisms, and techniques of plant and evolutionary biology, and ecology. Emphasis is on hands-on experimentation in the marine environment, analysis of data, and written and oral presentation of the experiments. Equivalent to BIO 44Y. Corequisite: BIOHOPK 43. Syllabus. Denny, Palumbi, Watanabe

151H

BIOHOPK 151H/251H Ecological Mechanics, 2 units

A continuation of BIOHOPK 150. The principles of life's physical interactions. We will explore basic physics and fluid dynamics to see how these physical principles can be used to investigate ecology at levels from the individual to the community. Topics: Thermal mechanics, biological materials, fracture mechanics, adhesion, beam theory, variation and scale, the statistics of extremes, and self-organization. In each case, we will learn the physics and engineering in the context of ecology. Open to students from all backgrounds. Some familiarity with basic physics and calculus advantageous, but not absolutely necessary. Denny

152H

BIOHOPK 152H/252H Physiology of Global Change, 2 units

Global change is leading to significant alterations in several environmental factors, including temperature, ocean acidity and oxygen availability. This course focuses on: (i) how these environmental changes lead to physiological stress and (ii) how, and to what extent, are organisms able to adapt through short-term acclimatization and evolutionary adaptation to cope with these stresses. A major focus of the class is to link changes in species' distribution patterns with underlying physiological mechanics that establish environmental optima and tolerance limits. Somero

153H

BIOHOPK 153H/253H Current Topics and Concepts in Quantitative Fish Dynamics and Fisheries Management, 1 unit

The course will focus on extensive reading of seminal and reference papers published in the literature in the last decade on modelling population biology, community dynamics and fishery management in the marine environment. Basic knowledge of population dynamics is welcome. The goal is to develop an appreciation on both traditional and cutting-edge modelling approaches to study the dynamics and management of marine populations subjected to natural or anthropogenic shocks and pressures. De Leo

160H

BIOHOPK 160H/260H Developmental Biology in the Ocean, 5-8 units, LAB

Lab course is designed to introduce students to the diversity in the early developmental strategies of marine invertebrates and how an understanding of these microscopic life histories is key to understanding the evolutionary diversification of phyla and the distribution of their more familiar adults. Emphasis is on hands-on collection, spawning, observation and manipulation of embryos and their larvae. Lowe     
Course Blog and example websites produced by students: Loligo, Hermissenda
Student Slide Show

BIOHOPK 173H/273H Marine Conservation Biology, 4 units

Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to marine conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example, endangered species, captive breeding, reserve design, habitat fragmentation, ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation). Also includes emerging approaches such as ecosystem based management, ocean planning, and coupled social-ecological systems. The course will include lectures, readings and discussions of primary literature, and attendance at seminars with visiting scholars. Prerequisite: introductory biology; suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course. Crowder

BIOHOPK 174H/274H Experimental Design & Probability, 3 units

Biology 174H is a course in experimental design and statistics.  It differs from many other statistics courses by integrating statistical concepts into the whole process of doing science, rather than something you just do after you've collected your data.  After a brief introduction to probability and the basic concepts of statistical inference, the course focuses on the Analysis of Variance as a tool for asking questions of nature and designing informative experiments to answer them. Watanabe   more ...

BIOHOPK 199H Undergraduate Research, 1-15 units

Qualified undergraduates undertake individual work in the fields listed under 300H. Arrangements must be made by consultation or correspondence. Block, Crowder, De Leo, Denny, Gilly, Lowe, Micheli, Palumbi, Somero, Thompson, Watanabe  more ...

   
SUMMER  

BIOHOPK 185H Ecology & Conservation of Kelp Forest Communities, 10-12 units, LAB

We will explore the forests of the giant kelp, Macrocystis, the rain forests of temperate seas, supporting a high diversity of resident species held together by a complex web of interactions.  Through daily scuba dives, lectures, labs, and group projects you get acquainted with many of the common invertebrates, fishes, and seaweeds that live here and how their interactions shape the community. Watanabe   more ...

Applications for courses and housing [at http://hopkins.stanford.edu ]

For more information on courses offered at Hopkins Marine Station, contact:

Hopkins Marine Station
Pacific Grove, CA 93950
(831) 655-6200
FAX: (831) 375-0693
hmsinformation at lists dot stanford dot edu

http://hopkins.stanford.edu

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Student Services Office
Biology
Room 108, Gilbert Hall
(650) 723-1826

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Earth Systems Office
Mitchell 138
(650) 725-0974